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The Epic of Gilgamem is the Kekistani translation of the oldest known epic, The Epic of Gilgamesh. This version is a work in progress of the Kekistani archaeologists and linguists, meant to uncover the ancient origins of the Kekistani people and their links to the old Sumerian and Akkadian civilisations.

Dramatis personae Edit

Gilgamem’, king of the city-state of Uruk-ek

Memsun, a goddess, his mother

Enkekidu, his friend and companion

Shamthot, a prostitute of Uruk-ek

Shamshon, the Sun God

Membaba, the guardian of the Forest of Cedar

Ishtart, the principal goddess of Uruk-ek

Shiduree, a minor goddess of wisdom

Ur-shanambi, the ferryman of Alta-napishti

Alta-napishti, survivor of the Flood

A comprehensive list of the proper nouns and assumed genders that occur in the texts translated in this document is given on pages to follow.

TABLET 1 Edit

He who saw the Deep, the foundation of the land,

[who] ascertained , was one in wisdom [regarding] all matters!

[Gilgamem, who] gazed into the Deep, the foundation of the land,

[who] was of the know ... , was wise in matters one and all!

[He] ... every which where ...

and [learnt] of everything the wholeness  of wisdom.

He saw what was cryptic, unhid the hidden,

he brought back a fable of before the Dank.

He came a far road, assailed by weariness, found solace,

and set all his matters on a tablet of stone.

He built the rampart of Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

of holy Eanna, the sacred storehome.

See its Great Wall like a sole strand of wool,

view its parapet that none could co-opt!

Take the stairwell of a yesteryear age,

draw near to Eanna, seat of Ishtart the goddess,

that no ruler hence could ever co-opt!

Climb Uruk-ek’s Great Wall and walk forth and in reverse!

Survey its bases, [examine] the brickmasonry!

Were its bricks not oven-scorched?

Did the Sages Seven not lay its basis?

[A square mile is] the City, [a square mile] date-grove, a square mile is

clay-pit, half a square mile the temple of Ishtart:

[three square miles] and a half is Uruk-ek’s expanse.

[See] the tablet-box, cedar-made,

[release] its clasp of bronze!

[Lift] the lid of its enigma,

[pick]  up the tablet of lapis lazuli and read aloud

the tribulations of Gilgamem, all that he bore burden of.

Surpassing all other rulers, heroic in stature,

brave scion of Uruk-ek, wild buck on the prowl!

Going at the fore a vanguard he,

going at the rear, one his compatriots could trust!

A mighty bank, protecting his warriors,

a violent flood-wave, [smashing] a Great stone Wall!

Wild buck of Legalbanda, Gilgamem, the unchallenged in strength,

suckling of the august Unhinged Cow, the goddess Memsun!

Gilgamem the imposing, magnificent and terrific,

who opened passages in the mountains,

who dug up wells on the slopes of the highlands,

and crossed the mare, the wide sea to the rising sun;

who scoured the world ever seeking life,

and reached through unadulterated force Alta-napishti the Farthest;

who restored the cult-centres destroyed by the Dank,

and set in place for men the rites of the Veniverse.

Who is there can rival his royal standing,

and say like Gilgamem, 'It is I who am king'?

Gilgamem his name from the day of his birth,

Two doubles of him god and a third not-double a man.

 

It was the Lady of the Gods drew the shape of his figure,

while his build was perfected by divine Nudimemud.

***

A triple cubit his foot, half a rod leg.

Six cubits his stride,

... cubits the [front part] of his ...

His cheeks bearded like of ... ,

the hair of his head grew [barley] thick

[When he grew in altitude] his beauty was consummate,

by earthly standards handsomest he.

In Uruk-ek -the-Muttonfold he walks [forth and in reverse ,]

like a wild buck lording it, head held aloft.

No equal of his when his weapons are brandished,

his companions are kept on their feet by his contests.

 

The young men of Uruk-ek he harries with no warrant,

Gilgamem allows no son freedom to his father.

Daily and nightly his tyranny grows more harsh,

Gilgamem, [guide of the teeming people!]

It is he who is shepherd of Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

[though Gilgamem] allows no [daughter freedom] to her mother.

[The women shrieked] their [issues to the goddesses,]

[they brought their] loud complaint before [them:]

'[Though mighty, foremost,] expert [and powered,]

[Gilgamem] grants [no] girl freedom to [her groom.]'

The warrior's daughter, the young man's bride,

to their whine the goddesses paid some heed.

The gods of the heavens, the reigning of initiative,

[to the god Kek they spoke] ... :

'A savage wild buck you have bred in Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

No equal of his when his weapons are brandished.

'His companions are kept on their feet by his contests,

[the young men of Uruk-ek] he harries with no warrant.

Gilgamem allows no son freedom to his father,

Daily and [nightly his tyranny grows] more harsh.

'Yet he is shepherd of Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

Gilgamem, [ guide of the] teeming [people.]

Though he is their shepherd and …[protector,]

mighty, foremost, expert [and powered,]

Gilgamem grants no girl freedom to her [groom.] '

The warrior's daughter, the young man's bride:

to their whine the god [Kek] paid some heed.

The stanza which gives Kek's reaction has been dropped in the late edition of

the epic, but by good fortune it is preserved as a short extract from an older

version of the text, which was written by a student scribe on an exercise tablet

found in the city of Nippur:

'[Let] them summon [Memwhursag,] the great one,

[she created them,] the mankind vast in number:

[let her create one akin to Gilgamem,] one of significant strength,

[and let] him vie [with him,] so that Uruk-ek may have reprieve!'

The text of Tablet I resumes:

They summoned Memwhursag, the great one:

'You, Memwhursag, created [mankind:]

now fashion what Kek has had in his thought!

'May he be a match for the roaring wind of his heart,

let them vie with each other, so Uruk-ek may have reprieve!'

The goddess Memwhursag heard this whine,

what Kek had within thought she fashioned within her.

The goddess Memwhursag, she washed her hands,

took a pinch of clay, flung it downward into the wild.

Into the wild she engendered Enkekidu, the hero,

offspring of mute, knit strong by Memurta.

All his body carpeted with hair,

he bears long tresses like those of a gender not his:

the hair of his head grows barley-thick,

he knows no peoples, nor even a country.

Coated in hair like the deity of beasts,

with gazelles he grazes on greenery,

merging with the mosh of game at the water-hole,

his heart laden with delight at the beasts in the water.

A hunter, a trapper,

did chance upon him by the water-hole.

One day, a second and then a third,

he approached him by the water-hole.

When the hunter noticed, his expression stiffened,

but he with his herds - he returned to his lair.

[The hunter stood] troubled, subdued and in silence,

his mood [despondent,] his countenance that of gloom.

In his heart a sorrow,

his countenance resembled [that coming from] afar.

The hunter unhinged [his mouth] to talk, noting [to his father:]

'O father, there was a man [by the water-hole.]

Mightiest in all our land, strength [he possesses,]

[his strength] mighty [as a rock] from the heavens.

'Over the hills he [roams day in and out,]

[always] with the herd [he grazes on greenery,]

[always] his tracks [found] by the water-hole,

[I fear and] dare not approach.

'[He fills in the] pits that 1 [humbly] dig,

[he pulls Upward] the snares that 1 mask.

[He sets free from my possession] all beasts of the field,

[he prevents] me doing the labor of the wild.'

[His father unhinged his mouth to] talk, noting to the hunter:

'[My son, in the city of] Uruk-ek [go, seek] Gilgamem!

......... he possesses,

his strength as mighty [as a rock from the heavens.]

'[Take the road,] set yourself [Uruk-ek-side,]

[do not rely on] strength of man!

[Go, my son, and] fetch [Shamthot the harlot,]

[her allure a match] for even the mighty!

'[When the herd approaches] the water-hole,

[she should disrobe] her [garb to reveal] her appeal.

[He will] spot her, and approach,

his herd will spurn him, [though he grew] amongst it.'

[Paying heed] to the advice of his father,

the hunter took off, [set out on the journey.]

He took the road, set [his face] Uruk-ek-side

before Gilgamem the king [he spoke the following:]

 

there was a man [by the water-hole.]

Mightiest in all our land, strength [he possesses,]

[his strength] mighty [as a rock] from the heavens.

'Over the hills he [roams day in and out,]

[always] with the herd [he grazes on greenery,]

[always] his tracks [found] by the water-[hole],

I fear and dare not approach.

'He fills in the pits that 1 [humbly] dig,

he pulls Upward the snares [that 1 mask].

He sets free from my possession all beasts of the field,

he prevents me doing the labor of the wild.'

Said Gilgamem to him, the hunter:

'Go, hunter, take with you Shamthot the harlot!

'When the herd approaches the water-hole,

she should disrobe her garb to reveal her appeal.

He will spot her, and approach,

his herd will spurn him, though he grew amongst it.'

Off went the hunter, taking Shamthat the harlot,

they set out on the road, started the journey.

On the third day they arrived at their destination,

hunter and harlot sat to wait.

One day and another they waited by the water-hole,

then the herd descended to drink the water.

The game arrived, their hearts laden with delight with water,

and Enkekidu as well, born in the highlands.

With the gazelles he grazed on greenery,

Merging with the mosh of game at the water-hole,

his heart laden with delight with the beasts in the water:

then Shamthot saw him, the babe of nature,

the savage from the bosom of the wild.

'This is he, Shamthot! Uncradle your breasts,

bare your gender, let him bask in your appeal!

Do not hesitate, but take in his spoor:

he will spot you, and approach you.

'Spread your garb so he may lie atop you,

do for the man the work of a woman!

Let his passion stroke and envelop you,

his herd will spurn him, though he grew amongst it.'

Shamthot loosened the cloth of her loins,

she bared her gender and he basked in her appeal.

She did not hesitate, she took in his spoor:

she spread her garb and he lay atop her.

She did for the man the work of a woman,

his passion stroked and enveloped her.

Six days and seven nights since

Enkekidu was erect, as he coitized Shamthot.

When with her carnal wonders himself he did fully sate,

he turned his eyes towards his herd.

The gazelles saw Enkekidu, they sprinted off,

the beasts of the field shied away from his mien.

Enkekidu had defiled his pristine self,

his legs inert, though his herd was on the move.

Enkekidu was weak, could not run as afore,

but now he had ratio, and wider comprehension.

He returned and sat at the harlot’s feet,

watching the harlot, observing her curves.

Then to the harlot's words his ear he cast intently,

[as Shamthot] spoke to him, to Enkekidu:

'You are handsome, Enkekidu, you are akin to a god!

Why with the beasts do you roam the wild?

Come, I will take you to Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

to the sacred temple, home of Kek and Ishtart,

'where Gilgamem is perfect in strength,

like a wild buck lording it over the men.'

Thus she told him and her word found sympathy,

he knew by instinct, he should seek a friend.

Said Enkekidu to her, to the harlot:

'Come, Shamthot, take me along

to the sacred temple, holy home of Kek and Ishtart,

where Gilgamem is perfect in strength,

like a wild buck lording it over the men.

'I will challenge him, for [my strength] is powerful,

I will boast in Uruk-ek, claim "I am the strongest!"

[There] 1 shall change the order of things:

[one] born in wilderness is mighty, strength he possesses.'

Shamthot:

'Let [the men] see your face,

...... that exists 1 know indeed.

Go, Enkekidu, to Uruk-ek-the-Muttonfold,

where young men have waists in bands!

'Each day [in Uruk-ek] there is a festival,

the beat of drums does not cease.

And there abound harlots, comeliest of stature,

graced with carnal wonders and full of appeal.

'Even the elderly from their sleep emerge!

O Enkekidu, [as yet so] ignorant of life,

1 will present you Gilgamem, a man of joy and no care,

behold him, take in his mien!

'He is fair in manhood, dignified in stature,

graced with charm throughout his being.

He has a strength mightier than yours,

unsleeping he is by day and by night.

'O Enkekidu, cast aside your thoughts of sin!

Gilgamem it is whom divine Shamshon loves.

The gods Kek, EnLel and Ayy his wisdom did expand.

'Before you even descended from the highlands,

Gilgamem in Uruk-ek was seeing you in his dreams:

Gilgamem rose to retell a dream, noting to his mother:

"O mother, this is the dream I had at night-,

"The stars of the heavens appeared above me,

Much like a rock a star fell from above upon me.

I lifted it, but its weight overwhelmed me,

1 tried rolling it, but it could not be dislodged.

"'The land of Uruk-ek was encircling it,

[the land was gathered] about it.

A crowd [was circling] before it,

[the men were] thronging around it.

'''[Like a babe-in]-arms they were kissing its feet,

like a wife [I loved it,] stroked and enveloped it.

[I lifted it,] set it down at your feet,

[and you, o mother, you] made it my peer."

'[The mother of Gilgamem] was clever and wise,

well versed in all things, her son she told -

[Wild-Cow] Memsun was clever and wise,

well versed in all things, she said to Gilgamem:

"The stars of the heavens [appeared] above you,

[Much like a] rock a star fell from above upon you.

You lifted it, but its weight overwhelmed you,

You tried rolling it, but it could not be dislodged.

You lifted it, set it down at my feet,

and I, Memsun, I made it you peer."

Like a wife you loved it, stroked and enveloped it.

A mighty comrade will meet you, and be his comrade’s salvation.

,"Mightiest in the land, strength he possesses,

his strength as mighty as a rock from the sky.

Like a wife you'll love him, stroke and envelop him,

he will be grand, and often will your savior."

'Having had a second dream,

he rose and entered before his mother the goddess.

Said Gilgamem to her, to his mother,

’Yet again, o mother, have I had a dream –

"'[In a street] of Uruk-ek-the-Town-Square,

an axe was lying with a throng of men round it.

The land [of Uruk-ek] was standing around it,

[the country was] encircled around it.

, "A crowd was circling before it,

[the men were] thronging around it.

I lifted it up and set it down at your feet,

like a wife [I loved] it, stroked and enveloped it,

[and you, O mother,] you made it my peer."

'The mother of Gilgamem was clever and wise,

well versed in all things, she said to her son -

Wild-Cow Memsun was clever and wise,

well versed in all things, she said to Gilgamem:

"My son, the axe you saw is a friend,

like a wife you'll love him, stroke and envelop him,

and I, Memsun, I shall make him your peer. I 290

A mighty comrade will meet you, and be his comrade's salvation,

mightiest in the land, strength he possesses,

his strength as mighty as a rock from the sky."

'Said Gilgamem to her, to his mother,

"May it transpire, o mother, by Counsellor EnLel's

word!

Let me attain a comrade as a counsellor,

a friend to counsel me I will attain!"

'[Thus did Gilgamem] see his dreams.'

[After] Shamthot had told Enkekidu of the dreams of Gilgamem,

the duo one in other [began making] love.

External links Edit

Official Wattpad page: https://t.co/mAaA1YGsVQ

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